Monthly Archives: January 2012

Pedant at work

Thinking back to Wayne Booth’s essay, ‘The Rhetorical Stance,’ here’s a great example of the pedant corruption:

Note: this video is meant to be full of unintelligible jargon! For the history of the Turboencabulator, check out its Wikipedia entry and also the “It’s all Geek to Me” blog entry by Eric Albertson at Duarte.Com.

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Email tips

When it comes to professional communication, email can be both an positive asset and a difficult communication medium.  Here are some tips on how to be a better, more rhetorical, communicator when it comes to your electronic communication.

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TEDxUofS: March 24, 2012

A great event, here on campus! Quick, get your tickets while you can.

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“nuke – you – lerr”

Here’s a fun article: 10 Words you Mispronounce That Make People Think You’re an Idiot. Here’s a few examples:

NUCLEAR
Incorrect pronunciation: nuke – you – lerr
Correct pronunciation: new – clee – err

ESCAPE / ESPRESSO / ET CETERA
Incorrect pronunciation: ex – cape / ex – presso / ex – set – err – uh
Correct pronunciation: ess – cape / ess – presso / ett – set – err – uh

OFTEN
Incorrect pronunciation: off – ten
Correct pronunciation: off – en

Any words you would add to the list?

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:) or :-)?

I wouldn’t advocate using emoticons in professional communication, but they are a part of informal online communication.  As such, here’s an interesting article I came across today, discussing an academic paper on the reasons behind why people use noses or not in their smiley emoticons.

Why do people put emoticons in their online communication? What purpose do these little faces serve?

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‘What is unsaid can be as important as what is said.’

Remember the Nine Axioms of Communication we covered last week?  One of the Axioms is “Communication is frequently ambiguous: what is unsaid can be as important as what is said” (MacLennan 2009).

Communication theorist Nick Morgan has a post on his blog today that describes why it is so important to pay attention to the non-verbal messages we send. From his post:

Our unconscious minds are very good at reading the intent of the people who come within our sphere of awareness.  And when they’re talking at us, we unconsciously compare words and body language.  When they’re aligned, we get the communication.  When they’re not aligned, we believe the body language.

Check out his blog entry for an example of a British politician who had his ‘unsaid’ message be heard more loudly than the words of his speech.

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Kent Phillips Public Speaking Competition, *this Monday!*

Join us! All of the contestants will be former RCM 300 students. Come and see great examples of persuasive speeches!

For more background on the U of S alumnus Kent Phillips (who the competition is in honor of), here’s his entry in the Huskies Hall of Fame.

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